veganweedsoup:

skylark11:

beverlystokes:

policymic:

"Masculinity is a trait, not a gender"

In an effort to both allocate space for and document the existence of masculine women, photographer Meg Allen created a powerful series of portraits for an exhibit at Cafe Gabriela in Oakland, Calif.

Entitled BUTCH, Allen’s series not only represents genderqueer women for a broader, heteronormative audience, but reaffirms butch identity within the queer community at a time when “butch flight,” or gender transitioning, is arguably becoming more and more commonplace. It is, as Allen says on her website, “an homage to the bull-daggers and female husbands before me, and to the young studs, gender queers and bois who continue to bloom into the present.”

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These are some good looking folks

This is all I have ever wanted to see. My butch friends may sometimes get “Why don’t you just become a man?” in the same way folks would tell me “Why don’t you just be a butch lesbian?” Because masculinity and gender identity are two totally separate bubbles, that for some become a venn diagram, and for others, coexist peacefully inside of us.

Two things can exist independently, and coexist peacefully. Gender identity and masculinity/femininity/androgyny.

a lot of these babes are my friends and this project is really important to my city, it makes me so happy whenever i see it.

(Source: micdotcom)

40,078 notes

cravingdesires:

acidadebranca:
two-color:
Borobudur Temple (by Hengki Koentjoro)
Borobudur, or Barabudur, is a 9th-century MahayanaBuddhistTemple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. The monument consists of six square platforms topped by three circular platforms and is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues.[1] A main dome, located at the center of the top platform, is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues seated inside a perforatedstupa. It is the world’s largest Buddhist temple,[2][3] as well as one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world.[4]
Built in the 9th century during the reign of the Sailendra Dynasty, the temple was designed in JavaneseBuddhist architecture, which blends the Indonesian indigenous cult of ancestor worship and the Buddhist concept of attaining Nirvana.[4] The temple also demonstrates the influences of Gupta art that reflects India's influence on the region, yet there are enough indigenous scenes and elements incorporated to make Borobudur uniquely Indonesian.[5][6] The monument is both a shrine to the Lord Buddha and a place for Buddhist pilgrimage. The journey for pilgrims begins at the base of the monument and follows a path around the monument and ascends to the top through three levels symbolic of Buddhist cosmology: Kāmadhātu (the world of desire), Rupadhatu (the world of forms) and Arupadhatu (the world of formlessness). The monument guides pilgrims through an extensive system of stairways and corridors with 1,460 narrative relief panels on the walls and the balustrades. Borobudur has the largest and most complete ensemble of Buddhist reliefs in the world.[4]
Evidence suggests Borobudur was constructed in the 9th century and abandoned following the 14th-century decline of Hindukingdoms in Java and the Javanese conversion to Islam.[7] Worldwide knowledge of its existence was sparked in 1814 by Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, then the British ruler of Java, who was advised of its location by native Indonesians. Borobudur has since been preserved through several restorations. The largest restoration project was undertaken between 1975 and 1982 by the Indonesian government and UNESCO, following which the monument was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.[4]
Borobudur is still used for pilgrimage; once a year, Buddhists in Indonesia celebrate Vesak at the monument, and Borobudur is Indonesia’s single most visited tourist attraction.[8][9][10]

cravingdesires:

acidadebranca:

two-color:

Borobudur Temple (by Hengki Koentjoro)

Borobudur, or Barabudur, is a 9th-century MahayanaBuddhistTemple in MagelangCentral JavaIndonesia. The monument consists of six square platforms topped by three circular platforms and is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues.[1] A main dome, located at the center of the top platform, is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues seated inside a perforatedstupa. It is the world’s largest Buddhist temple,[2][3] as well as one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world.[4]

Built in the 9th century during the reign of the Sailendra Dynasty, the temple was designed in JavaneseBuddhist architecture, which blends the Indonesian indigenous cult of ancestor worship and the Buddhist concept of attaining Nirvana.[4] The temple also demonstrates the influences of Gupta art that reflects India's influence on the region, yet there are enough indigenous scenes and elements incorporated to make Borobudur uniquely Indonesian.[5][6] The monument is both a shrine to the Lord Buddha and a place for Buddhist pilgrimage. The journey for pilgrims begins at the base of the monument and follows a path around the monument and ascends to the top through three levels symbolic of Buddhist cosmologyKāmadhātu (the world of desire), Rupadhatu (the world of forms) and Arupadhatu (the world of formlessness). The monument guides pilgrims through an extensive system of stairways and corridors with 1,460 narrative relief panels on the walls and the balustrades. Borobudur has the largest and most complete ensemble of Buddhist reliefs in the world.[4]

Evidence suggests Borobudur was constructed in the 9th century and abandoned following the 14th-century decline of Hindukingdoms in Java and the Javanese conversion to Islam.[7] Worldwide knowledge of its existence was sparked in 1814 by Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, then the British ruler of Java, who was advised of its location by native Indonesians. Borobudur has since been preserved through several restorations. The largest restoration project was undertaken between 1975 and 1982 by the Indonesian government and UNESCO, following which the monument was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.[4]

Borobudur is still used for pilgrimage; once a year, Buddhists in Indonesia celebrate Vesak at the monument, and Borobudur is Indonesia’s single most visited tourist attraction.[8][9][10]

183 notes

boywedgie:

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Human Skin Gloves made by serial killer Ed Gein


I’d like to add “The Woman Mask” created by Ed Gein as well. Just ONE of the NINE he made.

As well as this bowl made from a human skull.
Ed Gein was….inventive

ed gein: the real life bloody face

boywedgie:

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Human Skin Gloves made by serial killer Ed Gein

image

I’d like to add “The Woman Mask” created by Ed Gein as well. Just ONE of the NINE he made.

Bowl Ed Gein made out of human skull

As well as this bowl made from a human skull.

Ed Gein was….inventive

ed gein: the real life bloody face

29,235 notes

troyesivan:

one day i will stop reblogging this gifset

today is not that day

(Source: coolfunnywhatever)

1,250,136 notes

myotpisgay:

i-make-doodles-lol:

hey look

image

it’s shakespeare.

that was the worst pun ever but im laughing

162,919 notes

Video by Elvishmischief

"TND. It sounds so much better. And hetero."

(Source: ladrats)

12,936 notes

ponycz:

Nine seasons…

CAN YOU HEAR ME CRYING

(Source: lasertagandcigars)

75,366 notes